Category Archives: artist books

Project Social Media Strategy

There is some crossover between the groups and well as some differences.

Audience #1: Students studying/creating artists’ books who want to visit the collection

Platforms: 

Since the collection of artists’ books is directly tied to George Mason University Libraries, I would take advantage of existing social media accounts.

  1. Twitter for FenwickMS2FL at @fenrefstaff because this particular Twitter feed is focused on events around campus, has interactions with a variety of campus organizations, and originates from the library where the artists’ books are held.

  2. Facebook account for Fenwick Library Research Services at https://www.facebook.com/fenwickresearch because the books are selected by the liaison librarians in this department. As a result, they conduct instruction and coordinate programming including exhibits.

Create new social media accounts to appeal to this particular audience.

  1. Create Instagram account because of the strong visual nature of the collection and because it is popular among younger internet users and artists. A consistent hashtag vocabulary needs to be created.
  2. Create Snapchat account because it is popular among younger internet users. It also allows for sharing of images and short videos.

Messages: 

The intention of these platforms is to (1) Advertise/promote the collection to students interested in books arts, especially students studying art and creative writing, since they may not be aware of its existence. (2) Highlight physical aspects of the books like materials, structure, and binding since it is meant to be a teaching collection to inspire students. (3) Highlight content of the books, including the sciences, math, and social issues, to appeal to a broader audience of students in order to show unknown possibilities for looking at these topics.

  1. Twitter: Post brief announcements about programming (e.g. exhibits, lectures, poetry readings, artist talks). Include images and possibly gifs and videos. Even though research shows that hashtags are not as heavily used with this platform, use a consistent tag that always links to the library and to book arts when appropriate.
  2. Facebook: Post brief announcements about programming (e.g. exhibits, lectures, poetry readings, artist talks). Include images and possibly gifs and videos. Provide a forum for feedback with the reply option. Tag appropriate groups like university departments and student organizations.
  3. Instagram: Take advantage of the visual nature of the books which is well suited for this platform. Highlight books from the collection. Include multiple images of the same book. Incorporate a standard vocabulary for hashtags. Tag the location as George Mason University to show where these books can be viewed (especially important for visiting students) and to promote the reputation of the library as a supporter of artists’ books.
  4. Snapchat: Share images and short videos of books from the collection. Highlight physical aspects of the books as well as the content.

Measure: 

  1. Keeping in mind the uniqueness of each platform, count the number of likes, shares/reposts/retweets, views, and comments.
  2. Look at more advanced metrics. Using examples from the blog post “7 Social Media Metrics that Really Matter—and How to Track Them,” track the following metrics:
    • Track click-through along with bounce rate.
    • Track share of traffic driven by social media platforms.
    • Track how posts are shared in comparison to similar projects. Will need to select relevant projects but select a manageable number.
    • Track the rate of conversation and not just the number of comments.
    • Track the applause rate or the ratio of likes per post to the number of overall followers (or page likes).
    • Track the amplification rate that measures the ratio of shares per post to the number of overall followers (or page likes).
  3. Create individualized missions/goals for each platform and include the above metrics. Chart the success/failures of each platform and evaluate/re-assess the need for this platform.

 

Audience #2: Book artists interested in seeing examples of work

Platforms: 

Since the collection of artists’ books is directly tied to George Mason University Libraries, I would take advantage of following existing social media account.

  1. Twitter for FenwickMS2FL at @fenrefstaff because this particular Twitter feed is focused on events around campus, has interactions with a variety of campus organizations, and originates from the library where the artists’ books are held. This platform allows for greater flexibility in following and being followed by unknown users.

Create new social media accounts to appeal to this particular audience.

  1. Create Instagram account because of the strong visual nature of the collection and because it is popular among younger internet users and artists. A consistent hashtag vocabulary needs to be created.

Messages:

The intention of these platforms is to (1) Advertise/promote the collection to practising book artists. (2) Highlight physical aspects of the books like materials, structure, and binding to inspire their own work and to provide examples for teaching, if applicable, since many book artists teach workshops and classes. (3) Highlight content of the books, including the sciences, math, and social issues, for inspiration.

  1. Twitter: Post brief announcements about programming (e.g. exhibits, lectures, poetry readings, artist talks). Include images and possibly gifs and videos. Even though research shows that hashtags are not as heavily used with this platform, use a consistent tag that always links to the library and to book arts when appropriate.
  2. Facebook: Post brief announcements about programming (e.g. exhibits, lectures, poetry readings, artist talks). Include images and possibly gifs and videos. Provide a forum for feedback with the reply option. Tag appropriate groups like professional book arts associations such as the College of Book Arts Association (because many book artists also teach at the college level) and the ABC Artists’ Books Cooperative as well as non-profits like Hand Papermaking. 
  3. Instagram: Take advantage of the visual nature of the books which is well suited for this platform. Highlight books from the collection. Include multiple images of the same book. Incorporate a standard vocabulary for hashtags. Tag the location as George Mason University to show where these books can be viewed and to promote the reputation of the library as a supporter of artists’ books. Keep in mind that this may attract artists selling their works which can be good and bad.

Measure:

  1. Keeping in mind the uniqueness of each platform, count the number of likes, shares/reposts/retweets, views, and comments.
  2. Look at more advanced metrics. Using examples from the blog post “7 Social Media Metrics that Really Matter—and How to Track Them,” track the following metrics:
    • Track click-through along with bounce rate.
    • Track share of traffic driven by social media platforms.
    • Track how posts are shared in comparison to similar projects. Will need to select relevant projects but select a manageable number.
    • Track the rate of conversation and not just the number of comments.
    • Track the applause rate or the ratio of likes per post to the number of overall followers (or page likes).
    • Track the amplification rate that measures the ratio of shares per post to the number of overall followers (or page likes).
  3. Create individualized missions/goals for each platform and include the above metrics. Chart the success/failures of each platform and evaluate/re-assess the need for this platform.

 

Audience #3: Librarians/archivists and museum professionals focused on artists’ books

Platforms: 

Since the collection of artists’ books is directly tied to George Mason University Libraries, I would take advantage of following existing social media accounts. I’ve included both of these accounts since other library and museum professionals are likely to follow/connect with other organizations.

  1. Twitter for FenwickMS2FL at @fenrefstaff because this particular Twitter feed is focused on events around campus, has interactions with a variety of campus organizations, and originates from the library where the artists’ books are held.

  2. Facebook account for Fenwick Library Research Services at https://www.facebook.com/fenwickresearch because the books are selected by the liaison librarians in this department. As a result, they conduct instruction and coordinate programming including exhibits.

Create new social media accounts to appeal to this particular audience.

  1. Create Instagram account because of the strong visual nature of the collection and because it is popular among younger internet users and artists. A consistent hashtag vocabulary needs to be created.

Messages:

The intention of these platforms is to (1) Advertise/promote the collection to other library and museum professionals working with artists’ books. (2) Highlight physical aspects of the books like materials, structure, and binding to assist in their own collection development and instruction. (3) Highlight content of the books, including the sciences, math, and social issues, to assist in collection development and instruction.

  1. Twitter: Post brief announcements about programming (e.g. exhibits, lectures, poetry readings, artist talks). Include images and possibly gifs and videos. Even though research shows that hashtags are not as heavily used with this platform, use a consistent tag that always links to the library and to book arts when appropriate.
  2. Facebook: Post brief announcements about programming (e.g. exhibits, lectures, poetry readings, artist talks). Include images and possibly gifs and videos. Provide a forum for feedback with the reply option. Tag appropriate groups like professional library associations, such as the ARLIS (Art Libraries Society of North America) which has a book arts special interest group, and related groups the College of Book Arts Association and the ABC Artists’ Books Cooperative.
  3. Instagram: Take advantage of the visual nature of the books which is well suited for this platform. Highlight books from the collection. Include multiple images of the same book. Incorporate a standard vocabulary for hashtags. Tag the location as George Mason University to show where these books can be viewed and to promote the reputation of the library as a supporter of artists’ books.

*I decided not to include Linkedin even though this platform appeals to educated professional. The goals is to represent a small collection within the larger library structure, but Linkedin focuses on individuals, companies/organizations, and associations.

Measure: 

  1. Keeping in mind the uniqueness of each platform, count the number of likes, shares/reposts/retweets, views, and comments.
  2. Look at more advanced metrics. Using examples from the blog post “7 Social Media Metrics that Really Matter—and How to Track Them,” track the following metrics:
    • Track click-through along with bounce rate.
    • Track share of traffic driven by social media platforms.
    • Track how posts are shared in comparison to similar projects. Will need to select relevant projects but select a manageable number.
    • Track the rate of conversation and not just the number of comments.
    • Track the applause rate or the ratio of likes per post to the number of overall followers (or page likes).
    • Track the amplification rate that measures the ratio of shares per post to the number of overall followers (or page likes).
  3. Create individualized missions/goals for each platform and include the above metrics. Chart the success/failures of each platform and evaluate/re-assess the need for this platform.

 

Additional issues to address:

  1. There are overlaps in the use of social media platforms to reach different target groups. For example, tagged groups like ARLIS may be appropriate for one audience but not the others. The solution is to tag multiple groups in the same post whether the post through Twitter, Facebook, etc.. Hashtags present the same issue and solution.
  2. Need continued posts to maintain connections. Set up time and quota for posting. This may lead to posting for the sake of posting.
  3. Allow for posting to selected platforms from the Omeka site by including quick links to Twitter, Instagram, etc.
  4. The Omeka platform would allow for blogging, but it may be more time efficient to include feeds to social media platforms such as the Instagram posts.
  5. Create templates for easier measurements, such as those from https://blog.hootsuite.com/social-media-audit-template, to make evaluation more efficient and less time-consuming.

Social media audit Step 4

Social media audit Step 1